You can recycle your old computers and TVs at these D.C. libraries

By on

By Andrew Giambrone, courtesy of DC Curbed.

The city is hosting a series of collection events through December

On June 15, the District of Columbia will kick off a series of events where residents and businesses can recycle their used electronics at public libraries. The Benning/Dorothy I. Height Library at 3935 Benning Road NE and the Chevy Chase Library at 5625 Connecticut Avenue NW will accept old computers, TVs, and related equipment from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the first events. Others local libraries will host similar collections through December as part of “eCycle DC.”

The program is spearheaded by the D.C. Department of Energy and Environment (DOEE) in partnership with D.C. Public Library (DCPL). In a statement, DOEE Director Tommy Wells says eCycle DC “increases access to the proper handling of these common household items that unfortunately have easy potential to become toxic materials that harm our health and environment.” Currently, additional collections are scheduled for June 22 at the Northeast Library (330 7th Street NE) and June 29 at the Woodridge Library (1801 Hamlin Street NE).

Samsung Electronics America and electronics-disposal company Wisetek will collect the used equipment, according to a release from Mayor Muriel Bowser’s office. The following types of old products, called “e-waste” by environmental experts, may be dropped off at the libraries:

  • computers and tablets with screens 6 inches or larger: desktops, laptops, tablets, small-scale servers
  • computer peripherals: computer monitors, desktop printers weighing less than 100 pounds, keyboards, mice, speakers sold with computers
  • televisions and peripherals: DVRs, DVD players, VCRs, signal-converter boxes, cable and satellite receivers, game consoles

The District banned electronics from its waste stream in 2018 and manufacturers of certain equipment are required to collect a percentage of what they sell annually, the release notes.

Photo: Benning/Dorothy I. Height Library by Getty Images

 

Samsung Electronics America and electronics-disposal company Wisetek will collect the used equipment, according to a release from Mayor Muriel Bowser’s office. The following types of old products, called “e-waste” by environmental experts, may be dropped off at the libraries:

computers and tablets with screens 6 inches or larger: desktops, laptops, tablets, small-scale servers

computer peripherals: computer monitors, desktop printers weighing less than 100 pounds, keyboards, mice, speakers sold with computers

televisions and peripherals: DVRs, DVD players, VCRs, signal-converter boxes, cable and satellite receivers, game consoles

The District banned electronics from its waste stream in 2018 and manufacturers of certain equipment are required to collect a percentage of what they sell annually, the release notes.