Play Together

En Espanol

Game On!

As technology has evolved, so has the library. In addition to classic board games, “gaming” at the library means Wii™ for all ages and early literacy stations with computer games for young children. Playing together builds bonds, not to mention hours of fun.

@ your library

  • Attend the next library Game Night, which may feature board or card games like Monopoly®, Scrabble®, checkers, Uno® and also multiplayer video games like Rock Band®, where the whole family can show off.
  • In November, see if your library is participating in the American Library Association’s National Gaming Day @ your library, which reconnects communities around the educational, recreational, and social value of all types of games.

At home & in the community

  • Host a family game night at home. Your library might have board games or video games for popular game systems that you can check out for free with a library card.
  • Try geocaching, a game that can bring your family together and show you a new way to learn about your world. Find hidden treasures all around you with this high-tech update on traditional scavenger hunts. Players try to locate hidden containers, called geocaches, using GPS enabled devices, and share their experiences online. Some libraries host geocaching 101 workshops or have geocaches, helping you explore the library building and its resources. To get started, visit www.geocaching.com.

Staying Fit

Over the past three decades, childhood obesity rates in the U.S. have tripled. Today, nearly one in three children in America are overweight or obese. Give your child a healthy start by promoting healthy eating and an active lifestyle.

@ your library

  • Libraries are home to resources for kids, teens and adults on nutrition, diet, sports, dance and exercise.
  • Introduce your baby to movement while bonding at the same time. Story time programs include movement, from bouncing baby on your lap to dancing. Some libraries also offer yoga for moms and infants.
  • Keep teens moving at the library. See what teen programs your library hosts for keeping teens active through Wii™ and DanceDanceRevolution®, yoga, karate and more.

At home & in the community

  • Go outside! Experts recommend kids get at least 60 minutes of active play each day. Beyond riding bikes, baseball and basketball, try something new together, like Tai Chi or hacky sack. For inspiration, check to see what media your library has for discovering new outdoor games and activities.
  • Hit the trails. Check your library to see what guides might be available on local parks and nature areas.
  • Make a run for the library. Literally! If your library is close enough to home, jog, bike or walk to your local library.

Unplug, Unwind and Get Crafty

Technology can help us be more productive, assist in learning, entertain and connect us to friends and family. But when we’re always plugged in, we can become disconnected from other people and activities. Arts and crafts provide alternative ways to help unplug, unwind and connect.

@ your library

  • Ask a librarian or check out the library website or Facebook page for arts and crafts classes, like painting, sewing, knitting and even classes on art projects made from recycled materials.
  • Some libraries offer storytime followed by creative activities inspired by the book that was read.
  • Use media from the library on crafting or crafting classes as inspiration for kids to make their own cards for a special birthday, Mother’s/Father’s Day or other special occasion.

At home & in the community

  • Make a time capsule together. Have everyone consider what to include, from a note about favorite music and movies and what everyday life is like, to photos, coins, small toys or other objects.
  • Teen crafting programs are especially popular in the library. If your teen is into crafting, ask him or her to pick a craft that you can do together at home.