By Steve Zalusky

Glossy black tables were covered in yellow tape with black letters bearing the phrase Art + Activism. Brochures, buttons and a reference guide to banned books were spread across the table.

A black rolling library cart with books stacked horizontally was also wrapped in yellow tape. On its shelves are books with fake covers masking the real ones, their spines displaying the reasons they were challenged – “Violence,” “Filth,” “Dirty Talk.”

The Columbia College Library in Chicago was making a statement against a censorship and sending a salvo in support of the fight for intellectual freedom.

The occasion was the library’s Banned Books Read Out, held during Banned Books Week, Sept. 27 – Oct. 3, our nation's...


at The Baltimore Sun

The Howard County Library System took several big steps in electronic programming over the past month, including becoming the first public library system in Maryland to offer a free education catalog of 3,600 streaming video classes and 150,000 tutorials.

On Wednesday, the library system launched the last of four new electronic services that combine to offer digital versions of more than 4,000 international newspapers and magazines, 80 language classes, and custom-...


by Abby Welsh, courtesy of Livingston Daily

Superhero fans throughout Livingston County in Kentucky put on their capes and revealed their secret identities during the first mini-comic con.  Genoa Township’s 2/42 Community Church was taken over by the heroes, who could tackle face painting, local authors, games and comic-drawing classes.

“It (was) exciting seeing everyone fill the room and participate in everything we had available,” said Janice Heilman, Howell Carnegie District Library organizer.  The comic con hosted by the Brighton District Library, Hartland...


by Charli Kerns, courtesty of Times-News

Rather than fade from the spotlight, the Henderson County Public Library (NC) seems to have taken center stage as the go-to resource center for many residents in 2015.  According to Trina Rushing, director of the county library branches, that’s in part thanks to the growing demand for digital and online services.  “Many people said digital would take over, and libraries will be obsolete. That’s just not going to happen; they’ll never be obsolete,” Rushing said.

Rushing spoke at...

Legislative Action Center: Take action for libraries

CeCe Bell:"Libraries bring families together."

Cece Bell

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Review of the Day

Hepplewhite, Peter (author). Illustrated by Tom Morgan-Jones.
Aug. 2015. 32p. Gareth Stevens, library edition, $26.60 (9781482431186). Grades 4-8. 392.3.
REVIEW. First published October 1, 2015 (Booklist). “Everyone loves the smell of their own farts,” this book declares brightly. “Bet you do too.” And that sets the tone for the whole shebang. This installment in the Awfully Ancient series takes a fearlessly chipper plunge into the history of excrement (referred to, for most of the text, as poo). From the archaeological impact of dug-up dung to early toilets in ancient Greece, Rome, Egypt, and China to the devastating effects a lack of hygienic waste disposal had in early London...